IRS Discloses Existence of Second Personal Email Account Used By Lois Lerner for Official Business

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Posted by Alexander Hendrie on Tuesday, August 25th, 2015, 11:29 AM PERMALINK

Lois Lerner had a second personal email account she used to conduct IRS business, according to a report by Washington Times reporter Stephen Dinan. The agency disclosed this information on Monday through a court filing for an open-records lawsuit that was filed by watchdog group Judicial Watch.

Update: Toby Miles is Lois Lerner's dog, according to a National Review article.

The email address, identified as “tobomatic@msn.com” was supposedly used by a “Toby Miles.” It is unclear who Toby Miles is, and what his relationship is to Lerner. Regardless, it is clear that this account was used by Lerner for IRS business. The email is the third used by Lerner for IRS business – she also used her official agency address and another personal address.

According to IRS lawyer Geoffrey J. Klimas, the agency only recently learned of the existence of this third email address:

“As the agency was putting together a set of documents to turn over to Judicial Watch, it realized Ms. Lerner had used yet another email account, in addition to her official one and another personal one already known to the agency.”

In his court filing, Klimas argued that the IRS previously hinted of the existence of additional email accounts based on a footnote contained in a 2014 letter that referenced Lerner’s “personal home computer and email on her personal email account(s).”

It is outrageous that new revelations are still breaking years after the public first learned of the Lois Lerner tea party targeting scandal. Earlier this month, a report by the Senate Finance Committee found that the IRS granted just one conservative group non-profit status over a three year period. The report concluded that Lerner’s personal political beliefs drove her to undertake a concerted effort to discriminate against tea party and conservative non-profits by delaying their applications and subjecting them to unnecessary audits.

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