2010 Spotlight: New Hampshire CD-1, Shea-Porter vs. Guinta


Posted by Amir Iljazi on Tuesday, May 19th, 2009, 4:48 PM PERMALINK


The 2010 election season is beginning to take shape as various individuals position themselves for primaries, special elections, and general election contests all throughout the nation. We here at ATR are always interested in learning more about those who seek to do the people’s work here in D.C.
 
Today’s focus is on the first congressional district in the state of New Hampshire, where Democratic incumbent Carol Shea-Porter will be going up against Republican Manchester Mayor Frank Guinta.
 
The race is an interesting one in that Shea-Porter narrowly defeated Republican incumbent Jeb Bradley by a thin margin in the 2006 election, and edged him out once again in 2008. Bradley now serves in the State Senate, so the GOP was looking to recruit a viable candidate to take on the popular Shea-Porter.
 
Mayor Guinta seems to be the man that the GOP wanted, and he brings a somewhat “home-field advantage” with him in that the city of Manchester constitutes a large portion of the vote for the district. Although Manchester leans Democratic, Mayor Guinta won re-election by more than 5%; so there is some bi-partisan appeal that may play well for Guinta come November 2010.
 
Shea-Porter as a legislator has - 
 
  • Voted YES on a $3 Trillion Budget
  • Voted YES on an Omnibus Bill that included over 8,000 earmarks
  • Voted YES on the $800 Billion “Stimulus” Package
  • Voted NO on a resolution calling for an “ethics investigation” regarding earmark practices by multiple members of the US House.
  • Yet to sign the “Taxpayer Protection Pledge”
Guinta as Manchester Mayor has – 
The election is more than a year away, but this contest will certainly be one to keep an eye on. If the results of the last two elections in that district are any kind of indicator, NH-1 will be a close one.
 
Keep visiting ATR for more “2010 Spotlight” stories about the most interesting races headed our way.

More from Americans for Tax Reform

hidden