THE INTERNET TAX MORATORIUM EXPIRATION

COUNTDOWN

Tell the Senate
to Make the
Moratorium
Permanent.
Click Here to Sign the Petition Before It's Too Late.
00
DAYS
00
HOURS
00
MINUTES
00
SECONDS

Zoe Crain

Grover Norquist Discusses Taxes and the Upcoming Election Cycle (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Monday, September 29th, 2014, 11:42 AM PERMALINK


Todd Beamon of Newsmax wrote an article about tax reform’s place in this upcoming election cycle.

Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, explained that Republicans are not talking much about taxes this election season because the media has focused on so many other issues.

“Do I wish everybody would talk about taxes all day?” he asked Politico. “Yes, in the same way that ministers wish everybody would read the Bible all day.”

“But am I reasonably happy that the congregation has a Bible and knows what they’re doing? Yes.”

Politico’s Brian Faler interviewed Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist about the media’s coverage of tax reform.

Grover Norquist, the influential head of Americans for Tax Reform, chalked up the lack of tax talk this year to the news media’s focus on other issues and rejected suggestions that Republicans’ enthusiasm for old-fashioned rate cuts has waned.

“Do I wish everybody would talk about taxes all day?” he asked. “Yes, in the same way that ministers wish everybody would read the Bible all day. But am I reasonably happy that the congregation has a Bible and knows what they’re doing? Yes.”

Photo Credit: 
Gage Skidmore

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Grover Norquist Discusses Kansas Gubernatorial Race (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Thursday, September 25th, 2014, 1:17 PM PERMALINK


Human Events ran an op-ed written by Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, regarding the importance of Kansas’s gubernatorial election.

The genius of Brownback’s 2013 legislation to abolish the income tax over time is that the law now states that each year that state revenue comes in above a two percent increase- and this happens in a normal period of modest growth- all the additional revenue is used to permanently reduce the state personal income tax. Beginning in 2019, after the first round of tax rate reductions are enacted, every year the personal income tax rates will fall until they hit zero. Then the corporate income tax rate will be brought down year by year to zero. Lastly, Kansas has a banking tax that will then be reduced to zero. The tax rates will ratchet down every year there is modest growth in state revenues. Kansas can- and now by law will- fund necessary government expenses out of the revenues from growth over time and use those to replace the personal and business income taxes.

Rachel Stoltzfoos of The Daily Caller wrote an article featuring Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist’s take on the impact of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback’s tax cuts.

“He’s actually governed well,” Norquist, founder of Americans for Tax Reform, told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “They’ve had strong growth.”

More people are moving into the state than are leaving, thousands of small businesses basically no longer have a corporate income tax, and future budgets will be stronger, he said, which are all steps in the right direction. “In the next ten years, a lot of money will come in through growth and that money will go back to taxpayers, not government unions,” he told The DCNF.

Americans for Tax Reform President Grover Norquist was interviewed for an article written by HNGN’s Taylor Tyler which delved into Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback’s campaign.

After tax reductions are enacted, personal income tax rates will fall every year until they hit zero, claims Norquist. “Then the corporate income tax rate will be reduced to zero,” along with the banking tax.

States that follow this plan will be able to “fund necessary government expenses out of the revenues from growth over time and use those to replace the personal and business income tax,” said Norquist, concluding, “if Sam Brownback wins in November watch for more governors who have his courage to challenge anti-reform Republicans in primaries and to phase out their state income taxes.”

James Kilgore of Counterpunch wrote a piece discussing recent conservative support for criminal justice reform.

To top it off, the right wing joined the “softer on crime” fray. Grover Norquist and Newt Gingrich sparked a conservative anti-imprisonment drift through their Right on Crime organization which decried the excessive use and cost of punishment. Then Rand Paul followed suit, standing shoulder to shoulder with Cory Booker to back a Redeem Act which would ease criminal penalties for juveniles. In the background a steady stream of popular advocacy combined with legislative and financial re-thinks appeared to be making major inroads into criminal justice orthodoxy. But last week, carceral optimism gave way to a much harsher reality. The Bureau of Justice’s annual statistical report on national prison population revealed that incarceration numbers were up for the first time since 2009. The rise was a mere 0.3% but even this slight uptick may have burst the bubble of the new paradigm.

John Gizzi of Newsmax wrote an article detailing a movement in Tennessee, supported by Americans for Tax Reform’s president Grover Norquist to keep the state from an enacting a state income tax.

“Basically, ‘Three’ is similar to constitutional bans on income taxes in other states, such as Florida,” Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, told Newsmax. “Although Tennessee has no income tax and Republicans hold super-majorities in both houses of the legislature, that will not always be the case.”

“You can’t always count on tradition to protect you. With the Democratic Party so left-wing, if it ever got into a position of political power- even for a short time- it is very possible Democrats could enact an income tax. So you’ve got to have this barrier to protect the taxpayer from the income tax.”

Photo Credit: 
James Watkins

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


ATR president Grover Norquist Appears on NBC's "Meet the Press" (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Monday, September 22nd, 2014, 4:14 PM PERMALINK


Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist appeared on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” hosted by Chuck Todd to discuss the successes of Kansas Governor Sam Brownback’s tax cuts. An excerpt of his remarks is below:

“If you want your taxes higher, vote for a Democrat governor. If you want your taxes lowered, vote for a Republican governor. Right now, it’s overwhelmingly Republican governors in the country, and the people who are losing are guys like in Illinois, a Democrat who’s raised taxes too much in the state.”

Mike Lillis of The Hill wrote an article following Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist’s appearance on “Meet the Press.”

“They’ve had 57,000 jobs in the private sector created in Kansas; they’ve actually been spending more money, each year in the state, on education than in the past,” he said.

“The reason why the entire left in the country has jumped on top of Kansas is they have provided a model, a successful model, that will phase out the income tax,” Norquist added.

Newsmax’s Greg Richter covered the debate between Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist and liberal author Thomas Frank this weekend on “Meet the Press.”

Norquist pointed out that there are 30 states with GOP governors who have cut taxes more than $30 billion over the past four years. The 20 states with Democratic governors have raised taxes $40 billion.

Those losing, Norquist said, are Democrats such as Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn and even one Republican, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett

Photo Credit: 
Gage Skidmore

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Silicon Valley Sees Red (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Monday, September 8th, 2014, 3:20 PM PERMALINK


Evan Halper of the Los Angeles Times wrote an article highlighting the conservative support for Silicon Valley tech companies.

Creativity and hard work also describe conservatives’ efforts to make inroads with the Bay Area’s innovation economy. Republicans, after musing about the possibility for more than a decade, have finally found a footing in Silicon Valley, ingratiating themselves with tech entrepreneurs who had long eschewed politics in general, conservative politics in particular.

Americans for Tax Reform director of budget and regulatory policy, Mattie Duppler, wrote an op-ed for Inside Sources detailing the intrinsic issues with new regulations proposed by the Department of Education.

The Department of Education’s rule would judge whether an institution can qualify for federal aid by mandating an average rate of repayment of student loans as measured against graduates’ income. Rather than applying to all higher learning, however, the regulation would apply primarily to private sector institutions. Non-degree, vocational programs at community colleges and other public institutions would be excluded, but not career-oriented degree programs at for-profit colleges.

The short-sightedness of such a metric is obvious; this arbitrary ratio may reflect bureaucrats’ prejudices, but not the quality and value of the education offered at schools. This will force private, career-focused institutions to evaluate potential students on their ability to pay back their loans, not on their needs or ability to succeed in their coursework. Thus, the rule unfairly targets populations who require assistance the most, further pushing higher education out of reach for undeserved communities.

The Los Angeles Register ran an op-ed by Matt Patterson, executive director of the Center for Worker Freedom, in which he detailed the continued fight of California farm workers against the state’s oppressive Agricultural Labor Relations Board.

The workers, led by Silvia Lopez, a 15-year Gerawan employee (where she has worked alongside her daughters and parents) said No. They said you don’t deserve our money. They said we don’t need anyone to speak for us. They said to the union, We don’t need you.

The only legal way to get rid of a union under state agriculture labor law is decertification. So Silvia gathered signatures from her co-workers.

The California Agricultural Labor Relations Board, the state agency that oversees these matters, told her she didn’t have enough names. So she went back and collected more. At last the board relented and agreed to a decertification election; voting took place last November.

But those ballots have not been counted. They sit in a safe in some bureaucrat’s office.

Photo Credit: 
Christian Rondeau

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Big Labor Targets California Farm Workers (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Tuesday, August 12th, 2014, 1:26 PM PERMALINK


Matt Patterson, executive director of Americans for Tax Reform’s Center for Worker Freedom wrote an op-ed  for Forbes, entitled “Big Labor, Big Government Team Up To Oppress Farm Workers,” highlighting the ALRB’s attack on California farm workers.

Last November, Silvia, along with thousands of her coworkers, voted in a decertification election to rid their workplace of the United Farm Workers (UFW), a union that had done nothing for them; the UFW had bargained no wages or conditions for the Gerawan employees, but still wanted three percent of their wages in dues.

For Silvia, that three percent is a significant sum. She saw no reason to surrender the money she earned with her own hands to union bosses, so last autumn she collected enough signatures from co-workers (3,000 to be exact) to trigger a decertification election. In November, the California Agricultural Labor Relations supervised the voting.

Unfortunately, the ALRB is refusing to count those votes. Was the UFW booted out of Gerawan? We don’t know- the ballots sit under lock and key in the Board’s office. The Board is claiming the votes can’t be counted until the election is “investigated.” Unfortunately, they are not doing any investigating, claiming they have run out of funds to do so.

Newsmax’s Greg Richter wrote a piece detailing the new confusions and challenges that will impact taxpayers next tax season as a result of Obamacare.

Ryan Ellis, tax policy director at Americans for Tax Reform, testified before Congress in early June that the upcoming tax season “has the potential to be one of the most chaotic in years.”

One of the main problems, Ellis said, is in the calculation of subsidies, which are done by estimate and may not reflect actual income- especially for those whose income changes dramatically during the year.

Photo Credit: 
Richard Masoner

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Individual Mandate Penalty Amounts to a Tax (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Monday, July 28th, 2014, 2:07 PM PERMALINK


Chris Conover wrote an article for Forbes, detailing recent IRS releases which demonstrated that the Obamacare individual mandate non-compliance penalty amounts to a tax.

We’ve actually known for some time that the individual mandate is a tax, for reasons laid out by Americans for Tax Reform:

The individual mandate surtax was written into tax law itself by the Obamacare structure.

The surtax is collected by, and enforced by, the IRS.

Revenues derived from the individual mandate surtax have always been scored by the Congressional Budget Office as tax revenue.

Chief Justice John Roberts pointed out that the individual mandate surtax is in fact a tax.

MoneyNews’s Dan Weil wrote an article regarding the necessity of corporate tax reform.

Obama has received some fierce criticism for mounting a charge against tax inversions rather than fighting for corporate tax reform.

Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, strongly disagrees with Obama’s strategy. “It’s the president’s fault that he has done nothing in five years to reduce corporate rates, which he said he was going to do,” Norquist tells CNBC. 

Photo Credit: 
Alan Cleaver

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Export-Import Bank Places Huge Burden on Taxpayers (and more...)

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Tuesday, July 15th, 2014, 1:52 PM PERMALINK


Kevin Mooney of the Daily Signal wrote an article detailing the massive financial burden the Export-Import Bank places on American taxpayers. He spoke with Americans for Tax Reform federal affairs manager Chris Prandoni.

Data compiled by the Western Energy Alliance shows federal leasing for oil and gas exploration on land has dried up as well. The end result of the Obama administration's energy policies at home and abroad is a "lose-lose" for taxpayers, Chris Prandoni, director of energy and environment policy at Americans for Tax Reform, told The Daily Signal. Prandoni says: 

"While President Obama's EPA was writing regulations that forced 300 American coal-fired power plants to close down, his Export-Import Bank conceded the importance of coal by financing overseas coal development. This lose-lose for the American taxpayer is particularly painful: Our electricity rates will increase as we pay countries to burn what we no longer can.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ran an op-ed written by Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist and director of state affairs Patrick Gleason regarding the conservative fight against excessive shared economy regulation. 

Now, despite the Democrats' urban dominance, cities may soon be up for grabs. That's because the party's refusal in most cases to embrace the innovative technology and disruptive businesses that have greatly improved city life presents a challenge to Democrats- and an opportunity for Republicans. 

Democrats face a tough choice. A big part of their base is the unions now facing off against such disruptive innovations as Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and charter schools. Do Democrats support the regulations pushed by taxi and other unions that help to protect the status quo but can also stifle competition? Or do they embrace innovative technologies and businesses that expand transportation options, create jobs and are increasingly welcomed by another key Democratic constituency: urban dwellers, particularly young urban dwellers?

Americans for Tax Reform international programs manager Lorenzo Montanari wrote an op-ed for Breitbart highlighting how new cigarette packaging regulations have failed in Australia and should be prevented in Ireland and the United Kingdom. 

The stated purpose of plain packaging is that once you take away tobacco companies' branding, people will be less inclined to buy their products. The results thus far appear to be the opposite. More than a year after Australia enacted the policy, studies by London Economics and renowned professors at the Universities of Zurich and Saarland (Switzerland and Germany) concluded it's not deterring adults nor adolescents from smoking. 

In fact, according to the tobacco industry's sales volume data, cigarette sales increased by 59 million sticks in Australia during the first year of plain packaging, offsetting a four year downward trend. The Australasian Association of Convenience Stores even reports that its members' sales grew by 5.4 percent. 

Jason Pye of United Liberty interviewed Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist, who described free market reform opportunities at the state level: 

"We're opportunistic right now. Nothing is moving at the federal-level because you have gridlock between a Democratic president and a Republican House, and neither is going to let the other team do anything either useful or evil," said Norquist. "But in the 50 states, there are 24 states with united Republican control, so there's the opportunity there to do pension reform, tax cuts, [and] concealed carry. In the 13 blue states, there they're raising taxes rather than fix the pension system."

Bob Adelmann of the New American detailed the success of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback's tax cuts. 

A close look at what is happening in the Kansas City metro area is revealing: From May 2011 through May 2011 (June numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics won't be published until July 18), almost three-fourths of job growth took place in Kansas City, Kansas. What's even more impressive, however, is that Kansas City, Kansas has one-fourth the population of Kansas City, Missouri: 145,000 compared to 476,000. As Will Upton modestly concluded in his blog at Americans for Tax Reform, "It is arguable that the 2012 spike [in employment on the Kansas side of town] was caused by businesses anticipating a better tax climate in Kansas after the 2012 tax cuts."

Photo Credit: 
Russ Walker

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Gov. Walker Not Phased by Opponent's Lies

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Thursday, July 10th, 2014, 11:13 AM PERMALINK


Americans for Tax Reform director of state affairs Patrick Gleason wrote an op-ed in Forbes highlighting Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s opponent, Mary Burke, who has been misleading her supporters with falsehoods about Gov. Walker’s tax policy.

Gov. Walker signed $650 million worth of income tax cuts into law in 2013, reducing all rates and consolidating the state personal income tax from five income tax brackets to four. Contrary to what Burke claims, low and middle income Wisconsin households actually saw the greatest relief from Walker’s 2013 tax cuts. The top rate was only reduced by one percent, whereas the bottom three tax brackets were reduced by anywhere from three to five percent.

Mike Godfrey of Tax-News.com wrote an article regarding a coalition letter sent to the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee, discouraging members from short-term tax reform measures.

The coalition, including such associations as Americans for Tax Reform, National Taxpayers Union, R Street Institute and Americans for Prosperity, pointed out that, “while the clock is running out on the legislative calendar for 2014, with the August recess fast approaching and the midterm elections around the corner,… there’s still not much taxpayers are seeing out of Congress on comprehensive tax reform.

Wall Street Daily ran a piece by Floyd Brown discussing “Cost of Government Day,” an initiative developed by Americans for Tax Reform’s Cost of Government Center.

Now, the Cost of Government Day had never fallen past June 27 before our current president’s tenure. But for the sixth consecutive year, it’s fallen in July.

This time, the official date was July 6, as calculated by Americans for Tax Reform.

In 2014, the government’s share of GDP has climbed over 50%. Our backpacker (the economy) can’t regain his momentum, and he’s struggling to make progress. You’ve probably noticed that the economy has been unable to reach pre-2008 growth levels. Instead, we’re having difficulty growing productivity, employment, corporate earnings and personal income.

Photo Credit: 
WisPolitics.com

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Grover Norquist Appears on C-SPAN Washington Journal

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Tuesday, July 8th, 2014, 12:06 PM PERMALINK


Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist appeared on C-SPAN Washington Journal, hosted by Pedro Echevarria, where he discussed a number of topics, including the continued impact of failed economic policies under President Obama. An excerpt of his comments is below.

If Obama’s economy had grown at Reagan’s pace, since the bottom of the recession, there’d be 10 million more Americans working. The cost of raising taxes, spending- creating new entitlements rather than reforming the ones we have that don’t work as well as we would like them to- is 10 million people out of work today. 10 million Americans don’t have jobs because instead of having lower taxes and less regulations, this administration has had more regulations, more spending, higher taxes, new government programs without reform.

Matt Patterson, executive director of the Center for Worker Freedom, wrote an op-ed in FlashReport detailing the fight of farm workers in California against union bosses and a corrupt labor relations board.

The union’s motivations are clear- a once-powerful force boasting over 50,000 dues paying members, the UFW has lost decertification elections time and time again over the last several decades. Farm workers have decided en masse that the union does little to justify its outrageous dues. Today the UFW claims merely 5,000 members; if they successfully organize Gerawan they will have instantly doubled their membership.  

The Washington Examiner published an editorial featuring the Cost of Government Center’s work surrounding “Cost of Government Day.”

According to the Cost of Government Center (which is part of Americans for Tax Reform), it took the U.S. economy 121 days- roughly the first four months of the year- to produce enough for government to spend at all levels (81 days for federal and 40 days for state and local spending). It took an additional 65 days to produce the resources required to pay for the costs of regulatory compliance at all levels.

Ashley Dobson of Red Alert Politics wrote an article detailing how Cost of Government Day has been pushed later into the calendar year under President Obama.

This was the sixth consecutive year that Cost of Government Day fell in July. Prior to President Barack Obama’s tenure in office, the latest it had fallen was June 27, according to Americans for Tax Reform.

Politico’s Morning Tax Briefing covered a letter sent to Congress by Americans for Tax Reform, along with other conservative organizations, imploring House and Senate committees to avoid short-term fixes in addressing corporate tax reform.

The groups- including the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, Americans for Tax Reform and Americans for Prosperity, among others- write in a letter that will be sent to the leadership of the House Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees today that they want to “strongly caution against the urge to take action on short-term fixes aimed at individual symptoms, rather than the entirety of the tax code. We are specifically concerned about proposals that seek to make changes to our tax laws as a means to pay for projects that are totally unrelated to tax reform. Attempts like these are a step in the wrong direction. Their passage will do nothing to help America’s job creators. In fact, it will make it even more difficult to achieve true tax reform.”

Photo Credit: 
Steve Jurvetson

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments


Threats to Uber and Lyft Present Opportunity for Republicans

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Zoe Crain on Monday, July 7th, 2014, 1:16 PM PERMALINK


Americans for Tax Reform federal affairs manager Katie McAuliffe authored an op-ed in the Bakersfield Californian encouraging support for The Email Privacy Act.

Though Americans’ online communications are currently vulnerable to government snooping, there is pending legislation in the Senate and House of Representatives that could remedy the gaping hole that exists in our privacy rights. The Email Privacy Act would extend protections to Americans’ private communications stored in the cloud. This legislation, led by Reps. Kevin Yoder, R-Kan., and Jared Polis D-Colo., has garnered broad, bipartisan support from more than half of the members in the House. This is legislation new House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy could help move forward to ensure Americans’ private communications stored online are protected. Moreover, there is clear momentum for protecting Americans’ data with the Supreme Court’s recent ruling that Fourth Amendment protections extend to cell phones.

Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist and director of state affairs Patrick Gleason co-wrote an op-ed in Reuters detailing the opportunity for Republicans in fighting against regulatory threats to ridesharing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

Politically, this presents an opportunity for Republicans to make a comeback in cities. By championing the often disruptive share-economy businesses, defending them against the status quo and focusing their political campaigns on these issues, the GOP can show it is the party that embraces companies that improve the quality of life in cities. 

Photo Credit: 
Alfredo Mendez

More from Americans for Tax Reform

Top Comments

Charlie

Hey guys,

Need a ride? Here’s a $25 credit for you to try Lyft - it's like a cab, but costs less. To get the $25, just download the mobile app for iPhone/Android and type in “FREELYFTD” in the payments section of the app. If you’re in a pioneer city, you’ll get free rides on top of the $25!

To order a ride, tap “Request Lyft” and your driver will pick you up in minutes to get you where you need to go

Feel free to share it with friends & family!


Pages

hidden