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Ryan Ellis

ATR Supports DeMint American Plan Alternative to Reid-Obama-Baucus Trillion Dollar Spending Plan


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Monday, February 9th, 2009, 5:19 PM PERMALINK


The Honorable Jim DeMint
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator DeMint:

On behalf of Americans for Tax Reform, I am pleased to endorse your
“American Option” as the best Senate GOP alternative to the Reid-
Obama-Baucus trillion dollar spending plan.

The “American Option” is a series of pro-taxpayer initiatives, including:

Cutting the small business tax rate from 35 to 25 percent, and reducing
income tax brackets to only three (10, 15, and 25 percent)

Cutting the anti-competitive corporate rate from 35 percent (the
second-highest in the developed world) to 25 percent (more in line
with the average rate of our European competitors)

Locking in the 15 percent rate for capital gains and dividends, which
will boost share prices for the 50 million “investor class” families

These, along with the other tax cut proposals in the “American Plan,” will
increase economic growth in 2009 and permanently. America will become a
magnet for capital, and the resulting wealth creation and job growth will
restore our prosperity.

I would encourage all Senators to support your “American Plan” amendment
this week.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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ATR Urges Senators to Oppose Budgetary Grand Compromise Because of Automatic Tax Hikes


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Monday, February 2nd, 2009, 12:16 PM PERMALINK


Dear Senator:

In a Washington Post article from February 2, 2009 (“Democrats Set High Goal of Sweeping Fiscal Reform as Senate Opens Stimulus Debate, Sacrifices Become More Urgent”), it’s speculated that now might be the time for bipartisan, long-term fiscal compromise. In the 110th Congress, the model for this compromise was S. 15, the “Stop Over Spending Act of 2007,” sponsored by Senator Judd Gregg (R-NH) and twenty-six of his colleagues. S. 15 was and remains a fatally-flawed bill which will guarantee an annual income tax increase.

S. 15 would require the President to transmit to Congress for an up-or-down vote a list of spending cuts and tax increases. It would create a point of order against raising income tax rates, but that’s cold comfort for those who see S. 15 as little more than a series of annual income tax hikes.

Some may object that the tax hikes recommended by the President must be “targeted.” However, Section 1021(g)(9)(A) defines “targeted” as “any revenue provision that has the practical effect of providing more favorable tax treatment to a particular taxpayer or limited group of taxpayers when compared with other similarly situated taxpayers.” In the real world of Washington politics and budget fights, this language could be used to justify virtually any income tax increase.

In addition, Section 212(b)(4) of S. 15 provides extra money ($1.885 billion over three years) to the IRS for an “enhanced tax enforcement initiative” to confront the socalled “tax gap.” In fact, this money would be used to intimidate taxpayers into making tax planning assumptions consistently in favor of the tax collector. Going after the “tax gap” is not a way to improve compliance, which is already very high. It’s a way to intimidate taxpayers into waiving their legitimate tax positions when dealing with the IRS, and thereby increase tax revenue through the back door.

Thirty-four United States Senators from both parties have signed the Taxpayer Protection Pledge to their constituents and the American people. In so doing, they promise to “oppose any net reduction or elimination of deductions and credits, unless matched dollar-for-dollar by reducing marginal income tax rates.” Support of S. 15 or any similar “grand compromise” is inconsistent with the Taxpayer Protection Pledge signed by these 34 senators.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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A Look at Daschle's Voting Record on Taxes


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Monday, February 2nd, 2009, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


A consistent vote against taxpayers

WASHINGTON, D.C.—A look back at the voting record of Health and Human Services Secretary-designate and former Sen. Tom Daschle (D-SD) shows a lifetime average score of just 7% on Americans for Tax Reform’s annual Congressional Scorecard. The Scorecard is comprised of the top votes of concern to taxpayers in a given legislative year.

Daschle was a consistent vote against tax cuts as well as a consistent vote for tax hikes, including the following “highlights”:

• In 2004, Daschle voted against keeping the Internet free of all sales taxes.

• In 2003, Daschle voted against reducing the capital gains and dividend rates to 15%.

• In 2003, Daschle voted against permanently killing the Death Tax.

• In 2002, Daschle voted against permanently killing the Death Tax.

• In 2001, Daschle voted against cutting income tax rates for all taxpayers, ending the marriage penalty, doubling the child tax credit, and killing the Death Tax.

• In 2000, Daschle voted against ending the marriage penalty, killing the Death Tax, and a gas tax cut for consumers.

• In 1999 Daschle voted against expanding Medical Savings Accounts despite endorsing the concept less than a decade earlier.

• In 1999 Daschle voted against an across-the-board 10% income tax cut, a capital gains tax cut, and killing the Death Tax.

• In 1998, Daschle voted against ending the marriage penalty and against tax-free education savings accounts for children.

• In 1997, Daschle voted against the creation of the Roth IRA.

• In 1995, Daschle voted against a constitutional amendment that would have required a supermajority to raise taxes.

• In 1993, Daschle voted for the Clinton income tax increase.

Tom Daschle, like Leona Helmsley, believes only ‘the little people’ should pay taxes,” said Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform. “He thinks he’s too important for that, and he gives the word ‘hypocrisy’ a bad odor.”

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ATR Encourages Senate to Include Repatriation In Tax Bill


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Thursday, January 29th, 2009, 4:26 PM PERMALINK


The Honorable John Ensign
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

The Honorable Barbara Boxer
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senators Ensign and Boxer:

Recent reports have indicated that the U.S. Senate may consider including a repatriation provision in tax legislation being considered next week. I would highly encourage you to use this option, as it’s a win-win for everyone involved.

The “American Jobs Creation Act of 2004” allowed companies to repatriate foreign earnings at a flat rate of 5.25% for 2005 only (under normal tax rules, companies would have to pay up to a 35 percent foreign and U.S. combined tax rate). The results were astounding. $312 billion was repatriated, resulting in nearly $18 billion in new corporate income tax revenue. The Joint Committee on Taxation predicted that less than $3 billion in new revenue would be generated during the repatriation year—a six-fold difference.

It’s important to note that most, if not all, of these foreign earnings would never have been repatriated and reinvested in the U.S. Rather than filling up pension balances, giving workers raises, and bolstering 401(k) and IRA balances, this $312 billion would be sitting in foreign bank accounts. They were a one-time shot-in-the arm to GDP of over 2.5%. Federal coffers saw tax dollars they otherwise would not have seen.

Once again, Congress has the opportunity to use repatriation to inject much-needed and non-inflationary capital into the United States. According to Decision Economics, $545 billion is sitting overseas today, ready to be repatriated. If even half of that money was returned to this country, it would represent a one-time boost equivalent to 2 percent of GDP. Hundreds of billions of dollars would be available to lend, pay down debt, restructure, and (most importantly from a taxpayer perspective) avoid any potential government bailouts.

Repatriation, though, should be the rule and not the exception. The United States is the only country in the world that tries to tax the worldwide income of its companies, and has set up complex deductions and credits as a result. A simple, territorial system similar to repatriation would be a pro-taxpayer and modern tax reform step.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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The Pelosi-Obama-Reid 'Tax Cut' Is Largely Just Spending


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Monday, January 26th, 2009, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


• The Pelosi-Obama-Reid regime likes to say they’re giving “tax cuts” to “hundreds of millions of American families.” The method of choice is “refundable tax credits.” Under their plan, even those with $0 income tax liability would receive a check from the government. Thanks to income eligibility phase-outs, many of the recipients of refundable tax credits are low- and moderate-income families with little or no income tax liability;

• According to the IRS, 46 million of the 138 million tax returns filed (33 percent) have no income tax liability. Yet these 46 million households would still be able to receive refundable credits, despite having zero income tax liability;1

• Pelosi-Obama-Reid often respond that these families have payroll tax (Social Security and Medicare tax, otherwise known as “FICA”) liabilities, so refundable credits are meant to “refund” these taxes;

Citing payroll taxes is a willful intent to mislead. Under current tax rules, the refundable Earned Income Credit and Additional Child Tax Credit already remove both income and payroll tax liability for 15 million filers (or 11 percent of families). These people neither have an income tax liability nor a payroll tax liability, yet would be getting a “tax cut” under Pelosi-Obama-Reid;2

• For some taxpayers, a refundable credit may reduce federal income tax owed. For others, it may be totally free money. For still others, it might zero out tax liability, with the rest being free money. The point is that all refundable credits are tax cuts for some, but free money for most. Congressional Democrats’ official tax scorekeeper, the Joint Tax Committee, calls the spending parts of refundable credits “outlay effects” and the tax cut parts “revenue effects.” Thus, even JCT admits that refundable credits are largely spending;

So the next time Pelosi-Obama-Reid touts a big tax cut, ask how much of it is actually just spending money on people who don’t pay taxes.

For more information, contact Ryan Ellis at ATR by emailing him at rellis@atr.org

1 Internal Revenue Service. “Statistics of Income.” Tax Year 2006, Table 2.
2 Data obtained by Joint Tax Committee via GOP Staff of House Ways and Means Committee

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ATR Supports Economic Growth and Middle Class Relief Act of 2009


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Tuesday, January 13th, 2009, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


The Honorable Tom Price
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Congressman Price:

Congratulations on your introduction this week of the “Economic Recovery and Middle Class Relief Act of 2009.” Unlike other so-called “stimulus” ideas supported by the Pelosi-Obama-Reid troika, the ideas contained in your bill set the stage for strong growth in 2009 and permanently after that.

Among the strongest elements of your bill are:

Cutting the personal tax brackets by 5 percent across the board permanently, harkening back to the Reagan vision for growth. Your plan makes sure that what the taxpayer gains with one hand he doesn’t lose with the other in repealing the alternative minimum tax (AMT)

Cutting the near-highest in the world corporate income tax rate from 35 to 25 percent, and allowing all companies to fully-expense machinery and equipment in the year of purchase

Making permanent the 15 percent capital gains and dividends tax rate, cutting the corporate capital gains rate from 35 percent to 15 percent, and ending the capital gains tax on inflation

Your bill should be the conservative alternative to trillion-dollar bailouts and massive spreading of wealth.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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ATR May Rate a Vote AGAINST The House Rules Package


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


Today, the U.S. House of Representatives will be voting on the rules of the chamber for the 111th Congress. Usually a routine affair, the Congressional Democrat Majority is using the formality of a rules vote to make it easier to raise taxes, and make it harder for minority Republicans to oppose tax hikes.

Because the Rules of the House will make it more difficult to oppose tax hikes and support tax cuts, ATR may rate a vote against adopting the rules in our annual “Hero of the Taxpayer” Congressional scorecard.

The rules changes will have direct consequences for the American taxpayer. Among other things, they’ll make it harder to cut taxes. Under existing rules, if Democrats bring a bill to the floor that includes a tax increase, Republicans could motion to send the bill back to committee and strike the tax hike, but the Majority’s rules package takes this option away. As families and small businesses struggle during these difficult economic times, shouldn’t Congress be working to cut their taxes, not raise them?

For more information, contact Ryan Ellis at ATR by emailing him at rellis@atr.org

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ATR to Dem Congressmen: Show Independence, and Vote Against Nancy Pelosi's Rules Package


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Tuesday, January 6th, 2009, 12:10 PM PERMALINK


Dear Congressman:

This past fall, you were elected by the voters of your district to represent their values—not those of the San Francisco voters who elected Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Many of you promised your constituents that you would be different, and not simply a yes-man for Speaker Pelosi.

Today, you have your first opportunity to assert your independence from the Speaker’s San Francisco values. The House will soon be voting on the rules for the 111th Congress. If you want to make it easier to raise taxes on
families and small businesses, I would urge you to support this rules package. If, however, you want to make it easier to cut taxes and prevent tax hikes, I would strongly urge you to vote against Nancy Pelosi’s rigged House rules.

Dozens of House Democrats call themselves “Blue Dogs” or “New Democrats,” by which they mean that they consider themselves to be more for limited government and lower taxes than mainstream Democrats. In the 110th Congress, Blue Dogs voted with Speaker Pelosi again and again for more government spending and higher taxes. This rules vote is their latest chance, and first of the new Congress, to assert real independence from Nancy Pelosi’s San Francisco values and Chicago machine tactics.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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ATR Supports H.R. 7298, Doubling Small Business Expensing and Creating An Auto Bailout Alternative


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Thursday, November 20th, 2008, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


The Honorable Doug Lamborn
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Congressman Lamborn:

On behalf of Americans for Tax Reform, I am pleased to support H.R. 7298, a common sense tax cut bill which you recently introduced.

Your bill cuts taxes in two ways, both of which are timely and relevant to our current economic instability:

1. It doubles and makes permanent “small business expensing.” Your bill doubles the small business expensing limit to $500,000, and allows businesses with up to $1,000,000 in asset purchases to benefit from full expensing. The alternative for many small businesses is long and complex depreciation, which is a tax disincentive to investment and growth.

2. It creates a $10,000 tax deduction for purchasing an automobilemanufactured in the United States. To hear the mainstream media, Big Labor, and Congressional Democrats tell it, the “U.S. auto industry” is confined to three companies in Detroit. In fact, America has a robust domestic manufacturing sector in autos. Toyota and Honda plants, which tend to reside in right-to-work states and are free from union pillaging, are booming. This provision moves the conversation away from bailing out a few unionized auto companies which failed to negotiate aggressively with the UAW, and toward a pro-taxpayer, free market solution.

I look forward to the debate on H.R. 7298.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

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Grover Norquist's Letter to Treasury Requesting the Full $700 billion in Bailout Money to Give to Am


Posted by Ryan Ellis on Monday, November 17th, 2008, 12:15 PM PERMALINK


Mr. Neel Kashkari
Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability
U.S. Department of the Treasury
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20220

Dear Secretary Kashkari:

I write today to formally request $700 billion from the TARP Capital Purchase Program. Since unionized auto companies, state and local governments, and certain credit card companies are applying, I thought I should, as well. Attached you will find the two-page application which I downloaded from www.treas.gov.

I am fully aware that some $125 billion has already been allocated as of October 29, 2008. However, given that the federal government has the full weight of the army, the FBI, etc. behind it, I am confident that you can re-appropriate this money from the likes of Wells Fargo (or their successor companies, if the current over-regulatory and over-taxing economic climate has caused them to go under).

I have a plan for this $700 billion which should be just what’s needed to get the American economy going. Since the money came from the taxpayers in the first place, I propose giving it back to them. With $700 billion in TARP funding, ATR would facilitate the following tax cuts:

Cut the corporate income tax rate from 35% to 15%, giving us one of the lowest corporate income tax rates in the developed world. We currently have the second-highest rate in the world (behind only Japan). This new 15% rate would give us the third-lowest rate in the world (ahead of only Ireland and Iceland). It would put us well below the Euro-zone average rate of 25%. Companies would be dying to set up shop in the United States. Estimated JCT cost: $170 billion1

Eliminate the capital gains and dividends tax. These rates are currently 15%, but actually represent a double-tax on corporate profits. When combined with the new, lower 15% rate on corporate income, capital costs would be at their lowest levels in nearly a century. Tax something less, and get more of it. This would also be an improvement over a suggested change we have made to the Treasury for years—allow taxpayers to index the cost basis of their capital assets to inflation (something which Treasury has the unilateral authority to do and which would be the equivalent of a 50% cut in the capital gains tax rate). Estimated JCT cost: $35 billion2

Cut the top personal income tax rate from 35% to a flat 15%. This would give the U.S. the lowest personal income tax rate in the developed world. Estimated JCT score: $235 billion3

Kill the death tax. Almost nothing is more capital-killing for small businesses and family farms than the estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes. Estimated JCT score: $24 billion4

Allow companies to fully-expense capital assets purchased the first year. Under current law, businesses and other taxpayers must usually “depreciate,” or slowly-deduct, capital asset purchases the first year. This capital-boosting proposal would allow taxpayers to deduct 100% of the purchase price from their taxes in year one. Estimated JCT score: $240 billion5

Put all that together, and you arrive at almost exactly $700 billion. It’s safe to say that allocating $700 billion this year toward these tax reduction goals would do much for economic growth. But there’s more that can be done that doesn’t require any more resources:

• Ensure that there is full transparency in the TARP program by putting every TARP transaction and contract online for everyone to see. Disclose potential conflicts of interest with TARP-oversight staff.

• Allow companies to repatriate foreign profits to the U.S. without having to pay a double tax. The last time Congress allowed this in 2005, over $300 billion was repatriated, boosting GDP 2%.
I look forward to receiving the money. Please consult my staff for any ACH transfer information your people may need.

Sincerely,

Grover Norquist
GGN:rle

1 Assumes current CIT revenue of 2% of $15 trillion GDP. Static score reduction of 57% to account for rate reduction from 35% to 15%
2 Based on 2006 IRS data (Table 3.4 SOI): http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-soi/06in34tr.xls
3 Based on IRS data (score is the difference between actual 2006 ordinary modified taxable income at a 15% flat tax rate and actual 2006 ordinary income tax generated)
4 Sum total of estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax receipts from 2004 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-soi/04es02yd.xls
5 Assumes gross domestic private investment of $2 trillion. Assumes 15% flat tax rate. Assumes current-law depreciation rate of 20% annually. Current law revenue loss minus full expensing revenue loss is the result. http://bea.gov/national/nipaweb/TableView.asp?SelectedTable=122&Freq=Year&FirstYear=2006&LastYear=2007

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