Patrick Gleason

Tennessee Has Opportunity To Become A True No Income Tax State In 2015

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Posted by Cooper Lohr, Patrick Gleason on Monday, February 23rd, 2015, 4:14 PM PERMALINK


Tennessee is smart to not tax wages. However, the state does have a tax investment income, known as The Hall Tax. Enacted in 1929 by then Tennessee Senator Frank Hall, the Hall Tax imposes a 6% levy on investment income. Senator Mark Green and Representative Charles Sargent have proposed legislation to repeal the Hall Tax and make Tennessee a true no income tax state. With other states, including many in the same region as Tennessee, moving to cut taxes and make their codes more competitive this year, it is important for Volunteer State legislators to make the most of the 2015 session by passing reforms to make the state as attractive as possible to investment, job creation, and retirees looking for a friendly place to settle down. The best way to do so is to get rid of the Hall Tax

Below is a copy of the letter Americans for Tax Reform sent to Tennessee Legislators, urging them to phase out the Hall Tax:

 

Dear Members of the Tennessee Legislature,

On behalf of Americans for Tax Reform and our supporters across Tennessee, I urge you to use the 2015 session to pass legislation that protects Tennessee taxpayers and fosters economic growth. After being hit with over 20 federal tax increases in recent years, it is imperative that state lawmakers stand up for Tennessee taxpayers.

One piece of legislation that does nothing to help taxpayers at all and should be rejected is Senate Bill 246, which would prohibit beer producers from owning distributorships except under very restricted and temporary circumstances. Legislation like SB 246 represents the classic case of government seeking to pick winners and losers. Passage of SB 246 would stifle investment and damage Tennessee’s reputation as a business-friendly state. The type of government meddling in legitimate private sector business transactions that would result from passage of SB 246 is the sort of thing one would expect to encounter in Illinois or California, not Tennessee. As such, I urge you to reject and vote “no” on SB 246.

A better use of time for lawmakers looking to benefit the state’s economy during the 2015 session is to pass legislation to phase out the six percent tax on dividend income, referred to as the Hall Tax. The non-partisan Tax Foundation released analysis showing how elimination of the Hall Tax would boost Tennessee’s economic competitiveness. Tennessee currently has the 15th best business tax climate in the nation. However, if lawmakers repeal the state’s tax on investment income, Tennessee would have the 11th best business tax climate in the nation.

The Hall Tax does far more damage than it’s worth, raising what amounts to less than one percent of state and local revenue. With average economic growth and modest spending restraint, lawmakers can easily cope with the Hall Tax’s elimination. It’s even more manageable when considering that proposals to eliminate the Hall Tax, such as those put forward by Senator Mark Green and Representative Charles Sargent, phase the tax out over a number of years.

Tax relief isn’t just good politics, it’s good policy. Tax Foundation economist William McBride reviewed academic literature going back three decades and found, "While there are a variety of methods and data sources, the results consistently point to significant negative effects of taxes on economic growth even after controlling for various other factors such as government spending, business cycle conditions and monetary policy."

In McBride's survey of 26 studies dating to 1983, he found "all but three of those studies, and every study in the last 15 years, find a negative effect of taxes on growth." John Hood, chairman of the John Locke Foundation, found that keeping state and local tax and regulatory burdens as low as possible fosters economic growth when he analyzed 681 peer-reviewed academic journal articles going back to 1990. "Most studies find," Hood discovered, "that lower levels of taxes and spending, less-intrusive regulation correlate with stronger economic performance."

Tennessee has lower taxes than most states, but that doesn’t mean lawmakers should rest on their laurels while other states in the region and across the country continue to propose and enact reforms that make their tax codes more competitive. As such, I urge you to use the 2015 session to make Tennessee a true no-income-tax state by beginning to phase out the Hall Tax and to reject onerous regulations, such as those that SB 246 would lead to. Americans for Tax Reform will continue to follow these issues closely throughout session and will be educating your constituents as to how you vote on these important matters. If you have any questions, please contact Patrick Gleason, ATR’s director of state affairs, at (202) 785-0266 or pgleason@atr.org.

Onward,

Grover Norquist

Photo Credit: 
Ronnie R.

Top Comments

John

Tennessee is misspelled.


ATR Urges Utah Lawmakers To Support House Bill 141

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Posted by John McEwan, Patrick Gleason on Monday, February 23rd, 2015, 1:54 PM PERMALINK


Last year the Utah Department of Insurance issued a ruling prohibiting small businesses across the state from utilizing the services of Zenefits, a company that provides employers with a free online platform to manage human resources activities such as hiring, payroll, retirement plans, and health insurance. This behavior is highly unusual for a state that prides itself as a haven for innovative businesses, both small and large. Recognizing the direct damage this regulatory edict places on Utah's technology sector, Representative John Knotwell introduced House Bill 141 in the Utah House of Representatives. If passed, HB 141 would lift the ban on Zenefits and make clear that Utah supports innovative companies and technologies.

 

Below is a copy of the letter Americans for Tax Reform sent to Utah representatives urging them to support HB 141: 

 

Dear Members of the Utah House of Representatives,

Utah currently has the dubious distinction of being the only state in the nation to ban an innovative new technology that provides tremendous benefits for small businesses. On behalf of Americans for Tax Reform and our supporters across Utah, I urge you to support and vote for House Bill 141, legislation introduced by Representative John Knotwell that would fix this problem and ensure Utah retains its reputation as a pro-business state that welcomes innovative companies and entrepreneurs.

Last year the Utah Department of Insurance issued a ruling prohibiting small businesses across the state from utilizing the services of Zenefits, a company that provides employers with a free online platform to manage human resources activities such as hiring, payroll, retirement plans, and health insurance.

20th century brick and mortar health insurance brokers, rather than try to compete, decided to instead get state regulators to shut down their innovative competition. Imagine if early in the 20th century, horse and buggy operators successfully shut down the emerging automobile industry. That might sound ridiculous but it is analogous to what the health insurance brokers got Utah regulators to do to Zenefits.

This situation represents a classic case of protectionism, in which entrenched actors in an industry use the heavy hand of government to shutdown competition. The result of this is less choice and higher costs for consumers. In the case of the Zenefits ban, the victims are Utah small businesses, the engines of job-creation, who are now needlessly deprived of easy-to-use technology that was reducing costs and increasing their job-creating capacity. Such a misguided ruling, aside from the economic harm it does to in-state employers, does great damage to Utah’s reputation as a business-friendly state that is attractive to high tech companies, entrepreneurs, and startups. HB 141 would reverse this damage and ensure Utah retains its status as a hub of commerce and innovation.

HB 141 would, if passed, lift the ban on Zenefits and make clear that Utah supports innovative companies and technologies. Passage of HB 141 would clarify a confusing law that does unnecessary harm to Utah small businesses. Lifting the ban on Zenefits will provide Utah employers with an easy-to-use online platform that reduces costs, thereby freeing up resources to invest in their businesses and hire more workers. As such, I urge you to support HB 141, legislation that is important to Utah’s economy and reputation.

Americans for Tax Reform will continue to follow this issue closely throughout the session and will be educating your constituents as to how you vote on this important matter. If you have any questions, please contact Patrick Gleason, ATR’s director of state affairs, at (202) 785-0266 or pgleason@atr.org.

Onward,

Grover Norquist

President, Americans for Tax Reform

Photo Credit: 
Mathieu Thouvenin

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Americans for Tax Refrom Supports the Mississippi Taxpayer Pay Raise Act

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Posted by Patrick Gleason on Wednesday, February 11th, 2015, 1:04 PM PERMALINK


In a new Forbes column, ATR's Patrick Gleason highlights a pro-growth tax reform proposal unveiled in Mississippi yesterday by Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves (R). Read Gleason's piece below to find out how Lt. Gov. Reeves' proposal, if approved by legislators, would make Mississippi more economically competitive, would increase the job-creating capacity of in-state employers, and would allow Mississippi taxpayers to keep more of their hard earned income.

 

Forbes: Tax Reform Continues To Sweep Through The South

By: Patrick M. Gleason

Today, Mississippi Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves (R) introduced a plan, dubbed the Taxpayer Pay Raise Act, that would reform the state’s tax code in a manner that makes the state more competitive, fosters economic growth, and allow individuals, families, and employers across Mississippi to keep more of their hard-earned taxpayer dollars. The plan is projected to save taxpayers $400 million per year once fully phased in.

One of the most pro-growth aspects of Lt. Gov. Reeves’ proposal is its phase out of the state’s franchise tax, one of the most economical damaging taxes a state could have on its books. David Brunori, professor of public policy at George Washington University and Forbes contributor, explains why franchise taxes are so harmful and even worse than traditional corporate taxes:

“The Mississippi tax is essentially a tax on capital. That is ludicrous in a global economy. Companies in Mississippi pay $2.50 per $1,000 of capital or property, whichever is greater. There is no limit. The more capital employed, the higher the tax.”

Click here to read the rest of the column on Forbes.com

Photo Credit: 
Ana Feliciano

Top Comments

Boomer Brown

Reducing taxes incents spending and investing which is good for all.

JD

This is not the global economy, it's America....something Grover forgot about...You give more and more to Corporations and they just move it over seas....Where is it we live again Grover?


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