Celeste Arenas

FCC fraud prevention protects taxpayers and low-income Americans

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Celeste Arenas on Thursday, February 16th, 2017, 3:35 PM PERMALINK

Executive Director of Digital Liberty Katie McAuliffe published an op-ed on the Hill demonstrating why the FCC needs better fraud prevention in light of a criminal case wasting hundreds of millions in taxpayer funds and failing to serve low-income Americans with no communication access.

“In 2010 the FCC became aware of $6.5 million fraudulently obtained by Sandwich Isles Communications owner, Albert Hee, from the USF’s High Cost program. But the agency waited 4 years to take action. During the FCC's inaction, more than $100 million in taxpayer dollars meant to help the disconnected lined the pockets of Albert Hee.

The FCC must actively prevent waste, fraud, and abuse in the distribution and allocation of taxpayer funds. The cost of fraudulent companies and their subsequent, lengthy investigations detracts from funds specifically designed for assisting low income Americans in accessing communications technology.”

Read the full article here.

Photo Credit: 
Markito Images

More from Americans for Tax Reform


Support for Modernization of the Copyright Office

Share on Facebook
Tweet this Story
Pin this Image

Posted by Celeste Arenas on Wednesday, February 1st, 2017, 5:39 PM PERMALINK

Americans for Tax Reform and Digital Liberty submitted comments supporting the House Judiciary Committee's effort to bring the Copyright Office into the 21st Century.

The expresses general support for the Judiciary Committee’s policy statement that called for separating the Copyright Office from the Library of Congress, remaining part of the Legislative Branch and a Register nominated by the President and appointed with Congressional consent.

Digital Liberty stands with the House Judiciary Committee to support this vital reform that will improve the legal processes behind the US Copyright industry.

The implementation of the above reforms will give the Copyright Office a legal framework to catch up with the digital economy.

Copyright industries in the United States outpace overall economic growth by 70% and employ 5.5 million people, yet copyright registration can take 12 – 18 months causing hundreds of thousands of pending requests and delayed digital growth.

With an outdated legal structure, the Electronic Office Registration System (eCO) has done little to improve the efficiency of registration requests. As a separate entity with a nominated and confirmed Register, the Copyright Office is under greater discretion to manage its budget, update its IT structure and transition to automated digital records and registration.

Digital Liberty stands with the House Judiciary Committee to support this vital reform that will improve the legal processes behind the US Copyright industry.

Photo Credit: 
ArtsyBee

More from Americans for Tax Reform


hidden
×